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2009-04-21Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.1515/CCLM.2009.192
Cerebrospinal fluid and serum uric acid levels in patients with multiple sclerosis
dc.contributor.authorDujmovic, Irena
dc.contributor.authorPekmezovic, Tatjana
dc.contributor.authorObrenovic, Radmila
dc.contributor.authorNikolić, Aleksandra
dc.contributor.authorSpasic, Mihailo
dc.contributor.authorStojkovic, Marija Mostarica
dc.contributor.authorDrulovic, Jelena
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-17T11:45:35Z
dc.date.available2017-06-17T11:45:35Z
dc.date.created2010-07-01
dc.date.issued2009-04-21
dc.identifier.issn1437-4331
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/13120
dc.description.abstractBackground: Peroxynitrite was hypothesized to be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) through its various neurotoxic effects. Uric acid (UA) was shown to be a strong peroxynitrite scavenger. Methods: We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum UA concentrations in 30 MS patients and 20 controls with non-inflammatory neurological diseases (NIND) and correlated these findings with demographic and clinical characteristics of MS patients. Disease activity was assessed by brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the CSF/serum albumin quotient as an indicator of the state of blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Results: Serum UA concentrations were found to be significantly lower in MS patients compared with controls (p=0.019). CSF UA concentrations were lower in MS patients as compared to controls, as well as in patients with active MS (clinical and/or MRI activity) in comparison to patients with inactive MS or controls, but these differences were not statistically significant. Significant correlation was found between CSF and serum UA concentrations (p=0.016) in MS patients, but not in controls; and between CSF UA concentrations and the CSF/serum albumin quotient in MS patients (p=0.043), but not in controls. Conclusions: Our results support the significance of UA in the pathogenesis of MS. Decreased serum UA concentrations in MS patients might be due to both intrinsically reduced antioxidant capacity and increased UA consumption in MS. CSF UA concentrations may not be a reliable marker of disease activity in MS since its concentration is dependent on leakage of UA molecules from serum through the damaged BBB and the balance between consumption/production within the central nervous system (CNS). Clin Chem Lab Med 2009;47:848–53.eng
dc.language.isound
dc.publisherKooperation de Gruyter
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleCerebrospinal fluid and serum uric acid levels in patients with multiple sclerosis
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-100159163
dc.identifier.doi10.1515/CCLM.2009.192
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/12468
local.edoc.container-titleClinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-publisher-namede Gruyter
local.edoc.container-volume47
local.edoc.container-issue7
local.edoc.container-year2009
local.edoc.container-firstpage848
local.edoc.container-lastpage853
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewed

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