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2016-10-21Diskussionspapier DOI: 10.18452/18415
The Impact of a Negative Labor Demand Shock on Fertility
dc.contributor.authorLiepmann, Hannah
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-27T12:48:09Z
dc.date.available2017-09-27T12:48:09Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-21
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/19092
dc.description.abstractHow does a negative labor demand shock impact individual-level fertility? I analyze this question in the context of the East German fertility decline after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. Exploiting differential pressure for restructuring across industries, I find that throughout the 1990s, women more severely impacted by the demand shock had more children on average than their counterparts who were less severely impacted. I argue that in uncertain economic circumstances, women with relatively more favorable labor market outcomes postpone childbearing in order not to put their labor market situations at further risk. This mechanism is relevant for all qualification groups, including high-skilled women. There is some evidence for an impact on completed fertility.eng
dc.language.isound
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectFertilityeng
dc.subjectLabor Demand Shockeng
dc.subjectIndustrial Restructurineng
dc.subjectEast Germanyeng
dc.subject.ddc330 Wirtschaft
dc.titleThe Impact of a Negative Labor Demand Shock on Fertility
dc.typeworkingPaper
dc.subtitleEvidence from the Fall of the Berlin Wall
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/19092-5
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/18415
local.edoc.container-titleSonderforschungsbereich 649: Ökonomisches Risiko
local.edoc.pages53
local.edoc.type-nameDiskussionspapier
local.edoc.institutionWirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät
local.edoc.container-typeseries
local.edoc.container-type-nameSchriftenreihe
local.edoc.container-volume2016
local.edoc.container-issue42
local.edoc.container-erstkatid2195055-6

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