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2018-04-04Teil eines Buches DOI: 10.18452/19065
Using the Reciprocal Research Network for both Indigenous and Western Cultural Provenance Standards
dc.contributor.authorIsaac, Trevor
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-04T13:34:12Z
dc.date.available2018-04-04T13:34:12Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-04
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-86004-332-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/19806
dc.description.abstractWhat are the potential benefits of digital networks and databases that collect information from different sources – and what are their disadvantages? My contribution details the Research Reciprocal Network (RRN) and its approach to sourcing object provenance. The RRN is a collaborative online database created by the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) in Vancouver, Canada, through the »A Partnership of Peoples« project. The U’mista Cultural Centre is one of four co-developers of this groundbreaking online database. Focused on Northwest Coast museum collections, this research website supports the exchange of information from traditional knowledge keepers and academics alike. Users can share information, create discussions, collaboratively write documents, or upload files regarding specific objects from any particular partner holding institute. This unique platform facilitates collaboration and creates easy access to information to a greater audience, benefiting museum collections and the artefacts’ communities of origin. Provenance is especially important when speaking about collections of the Pacific Northwest Coast of British Columbia; mainly because of the way many of these artefacts have been taken and dispersed around the world. The RRN is a great way to learn multiple histories of objects from many contributors, but what are the pros and cons of this platform?eng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 DE) Namensnennung - Nicht-kommerziell - Keine Bearbeitung 3.0 Deutschlandger
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/de/
dc.subjectProvenienzger
dc.subjectkoloniale Provenienzger
dc.subjectProvenienzforschungger
dc.subjectethnografische/ethnologische Sammlungenger
dc.subjectethnologische Museenger
dc.subjectSammlungsgeschichteger
dc.subjectKolonialismusger
dc.subject.ddc300 Sozialwissenschaften
dc.titleUsing the Reciprocal Research Network for both Indigenous and Western Cultural Provenance Standards
dc.typebookPart
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/19806-0
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/19065
local.edoc.pages17
local.edoc.type-nameTeil eines Buches
local.edoc.container-typebook
local.edoc.container-type-nameBuch
dc.description.eventTagung »Provenienzforschung in ethnologischen Sammlungen der Kolonialzeit«, Museum Fünf Kontinente, München, 7./8. April 2017
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.booktitleProvenienzforschung zu ethnografischen Sammlungen der Kolonialzeit. Positionen in der aktuellen Debatte
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.editorLarissa Förster, Iris Edenheiser, Sarah Fründt, Heike Hartmann (Hrsg.)
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.pagestart91
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.pageend101
bua.departmentPhilosophische Fakultät

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