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2018-04-04Teil eines Buches DOI: 10.18452/19068
The »Africa Accessioned Network«
dc.contributor.authorSilvester, Jeremy
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-04T13:51:34Z
dc.date.available2018-04-04T13:51:34Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-04
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-86004-332-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/19809
dc.description.abstractIn Namibia, it is difficult today to locate many historical artefacts that embody the cultural identity of communities. Yet these objects have been collected and, often, archived (rather than displayed) in museums beyond the continent. The internet gives access to a disparate »virtual museum« of Namibian cultural heritage. The »Africa Accessioned« project aims to locate and list the diaspora of African ethnographic collections held in European museums as a tool to generate dialogue and collaborative projects. We see the project as a concept that could be extended, a concept that operates with little or no financial resources. Four African countries provided the initial focus for the project: Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The project initially mapped relevant collections held in Finland, Germany, Sweden, and the UK. A secondary exercise has documented Namibian collections in Finnish museums in more detail and will be used to demonstrate the project’s potential to develop the notion of the »museum as process«. However, the presentation will also speculate on the ways in which German museums might engage more effectively with Namibian communities. The project recognises the contextual framework of the circulation of material culture along colonial trade routes. It seeks to position museums as mediums for global dialogue. Conversations can enable source communities to provide greater historical depth regarding the intangible cultural heritage and places which provide a more complete biography of an object in a collection. However, establishing mechanisms to enable effective dialogue remains a challenge. The project is not a campaign for the repatriation of all African artefacts to the continent, but it will initiate debate about the provenance and significance of some artefacts. We believe that the willingness to review collections and to address the past can stimulate inter-cultural dialogue and lead to positive co-operation. European museums need to engage with this legacy, but should see dialogue as an opportunity, rather than a threat. Collections can generate connections. Museums can build bridges, rather than barriers, between communities.eng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 DE) Namensnennung - Nicht-kommerziell - Keine Bearbeitung 3.0 Deutschlandger
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/de/
dc.subjectProvenienzger
dc.subjectkoloniale Provenienzger
dc.subjectProvenienzforschungger
dc.subjectethnografische/ethnologische Sammlungenger
dc.subjectethnologische Museenger
dc.subjectSammlungsgeschichteger
dc.subjectKolonialismusger
dc.subject.ddc300 Sozialwissenschaften
dc.titleThe »Africa Accessioned Network«
dc.typebookPart
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/19809-0
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/19068
local.edoc.pages20
local.edoc.type-nameTeil eines Buches
local.edoc.container-typebook
local.edoc.container-type-nameBuch
dc.title.subtitleDo museum collections build bridges or barriers?
dc.description.eventTagung »Provenienzforschung in ethnologischen Sammlungen der Kolonialzeit«, Museum Fünf Kontinente, München, 7./8. April 2017
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.booktitleProvenienzforschung zu ethnografischen Sammlungen der Kolonialzeit. Positionen in der aktuellen Debatte
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.editorLarissa Förster, Iris Edenheiser, Sarah Fründt, Heike Hartmann (Hrsg.)
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.pagestart55
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.pageend68
bua.departmentPhilosophische Fakultät

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