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2016Teil eines Buches DOI: 10.18452/19346
Land Use Competition
dc.contributor.authorNiewöhner, Jörg
dc.contributor.authorBruns, Antje
dc.contributor.authorHaberl, Helmut
dc.contributor.authorHostert, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorKrueger, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorLauk, Christian
dc.contributor.authorLutz, Juliana
dc.contributor.authorMüller, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorNielsen, Jonas Østergaard
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-22T13:22:58Z
dc.date.available2018-08-22T13:22:58Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-319-33626-8
dc.identifier.other10.1007/978-3-319-33628-2_1
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/20107
dc.description.abstractThis chapter introduces competition as a heuristic concept to analyse how specific land use practices establish themselves against possible alternatives. We briefly outline the global importance of land use practices as the material and symbolic basis for people’s livelihoods, particularly the provision of food security and well-being. We chart the development over time from research on land cover towards research on drivers of land use practices as part of an integrated land systems science. The increasingly spatially, temporally and functionally distributed nature of these drivers poses multiple challenges to research on land use practices. We propose the notion of ‘competition’ to respond to some of these challenges and to better understand how alternative land use practices are negotiated. We conceive of competition as a relational concept. Competition asks about agents in relation to each other, about the mode or the logic in which these relations are produced and about the material environments, practices and societal institutions through which they are mediated. While this has centrally to do with markets and prices, we deliberately open the concept to embrace more than economic perspectives. As such competition complements a broadening of analytical attention from the ‘who’, ‘what’ and ‘when’ to include prominently the ‘how’ and ‘why’ of particular land use practices and the question to whom this matters and ought to matter. We suggest that competition is an analytically productive concept, because it does not commit the analyst to a particular epistemological stance. It addresses reflexivity and feed-back, emergence and downward causation, history and response rates—concepts that all carry very different conceptual and analytical connotations in different disciplines. We propose to make these differences productive by putting them alongside each other through the notion of competition. Last not least, the heuristic lens of competition affords the combination of empirical and normative aspects, thus addressing land use practices in material, social and ethical terms.eng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.subjectRelational perspectiveeng
dc.subjectLand covereng
dc.subjectGlobal changeeng
dc.subjectScalingeng
dc.subjectInterdisciplinarityeng
dc.subject.ddc910 Geografie, Reisen
dc.subject.ddc300 Sozialwissenschaften
dc.subject.ddc301 Soziologie, Anthropologie
dc.subject.ddc330 Wirtschaft
dc.subject.ddc303 Gesellschaftliche Prozesse
dc.titleLand Use Competition
dc.typebookPart
dc.subtitleEcological, Economic and Social Perspectives
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/20107-6
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/19346
dc.type.versionacceptedVersion
local.edoc.container-titleLand Use Competition: Ecological, Economic and Social Perspectives
local.edoc.container-creatorJörg Niewöhner, Antje Bruns, Patrick Hostert, Tobias Krueger, Jonas Ø. Nielsen, Helmut Haberl, Christian Lauk, Juliana Lutz, Daniel Müller
local.edoc.container-textThis book contributes to broadening the interdisciplinary knowledge basis for the description, analysis and assessment of land use practices. It presents conceptual advances grounded in empirical case studies on four main themes: distal drivers, competing demands on different scales, changing food regimes and land-water competition. Competition over land ownership and use is one of the key contexts in which the effects of global change on social-ecological systems unfold. As such, understanding these rapidly changing dynamics is one of the most pressing challenges of global change research in the 21st century. This book contributes to a deeper understanding of the manifold interactions between land systems, the economics of resource production, distribution and use, as well as the logics of local livelihoods and cultural contexts. It addresses a broad readership in the geosciences, land and environmental sciences, offering them an essential reference guide to land use competition.
local.edoc.pages19
local.edoc.anmerkungPublished first as (erstmalig folgendermaßen erschienen): Jörg Niewöhner, Antje Bruns, Helmut Haberl, Patrick Hostert, Tobias Krueger, Christian Lauk, Juliana Lutz, Daniel Müller, and Jonas Ø. Nielsen: “Land Use Competition. Ecological, Economic and Social Perspectives”. In: Land Use Competition: Ecological, Economic and Social Perspectives. Edited by Jörg Niewöhner, Antje Bruns, Patrick Hostert, Tobias Krueger, Jonas Ø. Nielsen, Helmut Haberl, Christian Lauk, Juliana Lutz, and Daniel Müller. Human-Environment Interactions 6. Springer, 2016. Chapter 1, pages 1–17. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-33628-2_1
local.edoc.type-nameTeil eines Buches
local.edoc.institutionIntegrative Forschungsinstitute
local.edoc.container-typebook
local.edoc.container-type-nameBuch
local.edoc.container-urlhttps://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33628-2
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameSpringer
local.edoc.container-firstpage1
local.edoc.container-lastpage17

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