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2016-03-10Teil eines Buches DOI: 10.18452/19858
Discourse level processing
dc.contributor.authorKaiser, Elsi
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-09T09:30:07Z
dc.date.available2019-04-09T09:30:07Z
dc.date.issued2016-03-10none
dc.identifier.isbn9789027267481
dc.identifier.other10.1075/aicr.93.06kai
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/20656
dc.description.abstractThis chapter provides an overview of how the visual-world eye-tracking paradigm has been used to investigate the processing and representation of discourse-level information. The chapter starts by reviewing some theoretical approaches to information structure, and then turns to visual-world experiments on the prosodic and syntactic reflexes of information structure, as well as the consequences of information structure for reference resolution. The notion of ‘prominence’ plays a central role in many of these investigations, in the shape of prosodic prominence (associated with new information), syntactic prominence (often associated with given or topical information) and representational prominence / accessibility in the domain of reference resolution. Comprehenders use prominence-related information to guide discourse-level aspects of processing, but prosodic prominence and syntactic prominence have different information-structural correlates. Furthermore, if we want to conceptualize reference resolution as a process sensitive to the prominence of mental representations, our view of what factors influence referential prominence needs to include not only entity-related factors (e.g. givenness), but also event-related factors (e.g. verb semantics and coherence relations between events). As a whole, the findings discussed in this chapter highlight the rapidity with which the human language processing system uses of discourse-level information, whether it be encoded in pitch accents, word order or the form of referring expressions. These findings suggest that discourse-level comprehension should not be relegated to a secondary stage of processing and instead occurs in tandem with other aspects of language comprehension, such as lexical access and syntactic processing.eng
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.subject.ddc400 Sprachenone
dc.titleDiscourse level processingnone
dc.typebookPart
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/20656-8
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/19858
dc.type.versionacceptedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titleVisually Situated Language Comprehensionnone
local.edoc.container-creatorKnoeferle, P., Pyykkönen-Klauck, P., & Crocker, M. W.none
local.edoc.pages35none
local.edoc.anmerkung© 2016 John Benjamins Publishing Company. This is the accepted manuscript of a chapter published in Knoeferle, P., Pyykkönen-Klauck, P., & Crocker, M. W. (Eds.). (2016). Visually Situated Language Comprehension. Advances in Consciousness Research. John Benjamins Publishing Company. The final version is available at: https://doi.org/10.1075/aicr.93.06kainone
local.edoc.type-nameTeil eines Buches
local.edoc.container-typebook
local.edoc.container-type-nameBuch
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameJohn Benjamins Publishing Companynone
local.edoc.container-publisher-placeAmsterdamnone
local.edoc.container-year2016none
local.edoc.container-firstpage151none
local.edoc.container-lastpage184none

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