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2018-07-17Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.3390/ani8070121
Valence and Intensity of Video Stimuli of Dogs and Conspecifics in Sheep: Approach-Avoidance, Operant Response, and Attention
dc.contributor.authorRaoult, Camille M. C.
dc.contributor.authorGygax, Lorenz
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-19T09:25:58Z
dc.date.available2019-08-19T09:25:58Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-17none
dc.date.updated2019-08-01T01:44:29Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/21155
dc.description.abstractStimuli are often presumed to be either negative or positive. However, animals’ judgement of their negativity or positivity cannot generally be assumed. A possibility to assess emotional states in animals elicited by stimuli is to investigate animal preferences and their motivation to gain access to these stimuli. This study’s aim was to assess the valence of social stimuli in sheep. We used silent videos of varying intensity of dogs as negative versus conspecifics as positive stimuli in three approaches: (1) an approach–avoidance paradigm; (2) operant conditioning using the video stimuli as reinforcers; and (3) an attention test. In the latter, we assessed differential attention of sheep to simultaneous projections by automatically tracking sheep head and ear postures and recording brain activity. With these approaches, it was difficult to support that the sheep’s reactions varied according to the stimuli’s presumed valence and intensity. The approach–avoidance paradigm and attention test did not support the assumption that dog videos were more negative than sheep videos, though sheep reacted to the stimuli presented. Results from the operant conditioning indicated that sheep were more prone to avoid videos of moving dogs. Overall, we found that standard video images may not be ideal to represent valence characteristics of stimuli to sheep.eng
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 4.0) Attribution 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectsheepeng
dc.subjectvalenceeng
dc.subjectvideo stimulieng
dc.subjectapproach–avoidance paradigmeng
dc.subjectoperant conditioningeng
dc.subjectattentioneng
dc.subject.ddc590 Tiere (Zoologie)none
dc.titleValence and Intensity of Video Stimuli of Dogs and Conspecifics in Sheep: Approach-Avoidance, Operant Response, and Attentionnone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/21155-9
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ani8070121none
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/20405
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titleAnimalsnone
local.edoc.pages24none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.institutionLebenswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameMDPInone
local.edoc.container-publisher-placeBaselnone
local.edoc.container-volume8none
local.edoc.container-issue7none
local.edoc.container-firstpage121/1none
local.edoc.container-lastpage121/24none
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
dc.identifier.eissn2076-2615
local.edoc.affiliationRaoult, Camille M. C.; Centre for Proper Housing of Ruminants and Pigs, Federal Food Safety and Veterinary Office FSVO, Agroscope, Tänikon 1, 8356 Ettenhausen, Switzerland, Animal Welfare Division, Veterinary Public Health Institute, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, Länggassstrasse 120, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland,none
local.edoc.affiliationGygax, Lorenz; Animal Husbandry, Albrecht Daniel Thaer-Institute of Agricultural and Horticultural Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10115 Berlin, Germany,none

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