Show simple item record

2018-04-11Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.3390/econometrics6020020
Polarization and Rising Wage Inequality: Comparing the U.S. and Germany
dc.contributor.authorAntonczyk, Dirk
dc.contributor.authorDeLeire, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorFitzenberger, Bernd
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-26T09:35:22Z
dc.date.available2019-08-26T09:35:22Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-11none
dc.date.updated2019-08-01T16:40:45Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/21194
dc.description.abstractSince the late 1970s, wage inequality has increased strongly both in the U.S. and Germany but the trends have been different. Wage inequality increased along the entire wage distribution during the 1980s in the U.S. and since the mid 1990s in Germany. There is evidence for wage polarization in the U.S. in the 1990s, and the increase in wage inequality in Germany was restricted to the top of the distribution before the 1990s. Using an approach developed by MaCurdy and Mroz (1995) to separate age, time, and cohort effects, we find a large role played by cohort effects in Germany, while we find only small cohort effects in the U.S. Employment trends in both countries are consistent with polarization since the 1990s. The evidence is consistent with a technology-driven polarization of the labor market, but this cannot explain the country specific differences.eng
dc.description.sponsorshipDeutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 4.0) Attribution 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectwage inequalityeng
dc.subjectpolarizationeng
dc.subjectinternational comparisoneng
dc.subjectcohort studyeng
dc.subjectquantile regressioneng
dc.subject.ddc330 Wirtschaftnone
dc.titlePolarization and Rising Wage Inequality: Comparing the U.S. and Germanynone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/21194-9
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/econometrics6020020none
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/20425
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titleEconometricsnone
local.edoc.pages33none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.institutionWirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameMDPInone
local.edoc.container-publisher-placeBaselnone
local.edoc.container-volume6none
local.edoc.container-issue2none
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
local.edoc.container-articlenumber20none
dc.identifier.eissn2225-1146
local.edoc.affiliationAntonczyk, Dirk; Research Fellow, IZA, 53113 Bonn, Germany,none
local.edoc.affiliationDeLeire, Thomas; Research Fellow, IZA, 53113 Bonn, Germany, Georgetown University, Washington DC, 20057, USA, National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138, USA,none
local.edoc.affiliationFitzenberger, Bernd; Research Fellow, IZA, 53113 Bonn, Germany, School of Business and Economics, Humboldt University Berlin, Spandauer Strasse 1, 10099 Berlin, Germany, Institute For Fiscal Studies, London WC1E 7AE, UK, CESifo, 81679 München, Germany, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA), 6211 LM Maastricht, The Netherlands, Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), 68161 Mannheim, Germany,none

Show simple item record