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2018-09-07Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.3390/jintelligence6030041
How Specific Abilities Might Throw ‘g’ a Curve: An Idea on How to Capitalize on the Predictive Validity of Specific Cognitive Abilities
dc.contributor.authorZiegler, Matthias
dc.contributor.authorPeikert, Aaron
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-26T10:32:49Z
dc.date.available2019-08-26T10:32:49Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-07none
dc.date.updated2019-08-01T11:48:48Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/21199
dc.description.abstractSchool grades are still used by universities and employers for selection purposes. Thus, identifying determinants of school grades is important. Broadly, two predictor categories can be differentiated from an individual difference perspective: cognitive abilities and personality traits. Over time, evidence accumulated supporting the notion of the g-factor as the best single predictor of school grades. Specific abilities were shown to add little incremental validity. The current paper aims at reviving research on which cognitive abilities predict performance. Based on ideas of criterion contamination and deficiency as well as Spearman’s ability differentiation hypothesis, two mechanisms are suggested which both would lead to curvilinear relations between specific abilities and grades. While the data set provided for this special issue does not allow testing these mechanisms directly, we tested the idea of curvilinear relations. In particular, polynomial regressions were used. Machine learning was applied to identify the best fitting models in each of the subjects math, German, and English. In particular, we fitted polynomial models with varying degrees and evaluated their accuracy with a leave-one-out validation approach. The results show that tests of specific abilities slightly outperform the g-factor when curvilinearity is assumed. Possible theoretical explanations are discussed.fre
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 4.0) Attribution 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectg-factoreng
dc.subjectspecific abilitieseng
dc.subjectscholastic performanceeng
dc.subjectschool gradeseng
dc.subjectschool gradeseng
dc.subjectcurvilinear relationseng
dc.subjectability differentiationeng
dc.subject.ddc610 Medizin und Gesundheitnone
dc.subject.ddc150 Psychologienone
dc.titleHow Specific Abilities Might Throw ‘g’ a Curve: An Idea on How to Capitalize on the Predictive Validity of Specific Cognitive Abilitiesnone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/21199-1
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/jintelligence6030041none
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/20429
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titleJournal of Intelligencenone
local.edoc.pages21none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.institutionLebenswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameMDPInone
local.edoc.container-publisher-placeBaselnone
local.edoc.container-volume6none
local.edoc.container-issue3none
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
local.edoc.container-articlenumber41none
dc.identifier.eissn2079-3200
local.edoc.affiliationZiegler, Matthias; Psychological Institute, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin, Germany,none
local.edoc.affiliationPeikert, Aaron; Psychological Institute, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin, Germany,none

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