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2018-03-30Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.3390/su10041034
Exploring Farmers’ Indigenous Knowledge of Soil Quality and Fertility Management Practices in Selected Farming Communities of the Guinea Savannah Agro-Ecological Zone of Ghana
dc.contributor.authorOmari, Richard
dc.contributor.authorSonoko Bellingrath-Kimura, Dorothea
dc.contributor.authorSarkodee-Addo, Elsie
dc.contributor.authorOikawa, Yosei
dc.contributor.authorFujii, Yoshiharu
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-28T10:25:27Z
dc.date.available2019-08-28T10:25:27Z
dc.date.issued2018-03-30none
dc.date.updated2019-08-01T17:02:01Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/21215
dc.description.abstractEfforts to improve soil productive capacity aimed at boosting crop production in the Northern Ghana has primarily focused on field-based experiments with little documentation on farmer practice and local indigenous knowledge of soil management. A sample group of 114 farmers from five farming communities in the Guinea Savannah was interviewed to evaluate their indigenous knowledge of crop production practices in the context of soil health, fertilization management, and crop yield. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and responses for each category were calculated using simple proportions. Farmers’ fertilization practice was primarily influenced by fertilization resource availability and crop yield response. The results showed that inorganic fertilization was the commonest fertilization type among farmers. Farmer local indicators of soil health were predominantly limited to visually observable signs such as presence or absence of indicator plants, growth vigor of plants, soil color, and tilth, texture, and compaction. Non-tactile and visible indicators, notably soil chemical composition and presence of soil microorganisms, was rarely used. The listed indicators were congruent with scientific reports, although some knowledge gaps, particularly on the use of indicator plants, were identified. The use of indicator plants as determinants of healthy or non-healthy soils appeared to be influenced by the ease of control of weeds, its utilitarian benefits, benefits to the soil, and threats on cultivated crops. Famers were well informed about the decreasing crop yield. Fertilization practices and limitations in soil management practices with proposed capacity building approaches aimed at enhancing productive capacities of cultivated farmlands are discussed.eng
dc.description.sponsorshipJapan Society for the Promotion of Science
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 4.0) Attribution 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectGhanaeng
dc.subjectGuinea savannah ecological zoneeng
dc.subjectfarmereng
dc.subjectsoil healtheng
dc.subjectsoil health indicatoreng
dc.subjectfertilizationeng
dc.subjectindigenous knowledgeeng
dc.subjectFerric Acrisol/Ferric Lixisoleng
dc.subject.ddc333.7 Natürliche Resourcen, Energie und Umweltnone
dc.subject.ddc690 Bau von Gebäudennone
dc.titleExploring Farmers’ Indigenous Knowledge of Soil Quality and Fertility Management Practices in Selected Farming Communities of the Guinea Savannah Agro-Ecological Zone of Ghananone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/21215-1
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/su10041034none
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/20446
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titleSustainabilitynone
local.edoc.pages16none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.institutionLebenswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameMDPInone
local.edoc.container-publisher-placeBaselnone
local.edoc.container-volume10none
local.edoc.container-issue4none
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
local.edoc.container-articlenumber1034none
dc.identifier.eissn2071-1050
local.edoc.affiliationAnsong Omari, Richard; United Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan,none
local.edoc.affiliationBellingrath-Kimura, Sonoko; Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research, 15374 Müencheberg, Germany, Institute of Agriculture and Horticulture, Faculty of Life Science, Humboldt-University of Berlin, 14195 Berlin, Germany,none
local.edoc.affiliationSarkodee Addo, Elsie; Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan,none
local.edoc.affiliationOikawa, Yosei; Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan,none
local.edoc.affiliationFujii, Yoshiharu; Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan,none

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