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2017-06-16Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.3389/fcimb.2017.00262
The Intestinal Eukaryotic and Bacterial Biome of Spotted Hyenas: The Impact of Social Status and Age on Diversity and Composition
dc.contributor.authorHeitlinger, Emanuel
dc.contributor.authorFerreira, Susana C. M.
dc.contributor.authorThierer, Dagmar
dc.contributor.authorHofer, Heribert
dc.contributor.authorEast, Marion L.
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-23T11:20:12Z
dc.date.available2019-09-23T11:20:12Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-16none
dc.date.updated2019-08-10T16:24:04Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/21291
dc.description.abstractIn mammals, two factors likely to affect the diversity and composition of intestinal bacteria (bacterial microbiome) and eukaryotes (eukaryome) are social status and age. In species in which social status determines access to resources, socially dominant animals maintain better immune processes and health status than subordinates. As high species diversity is an index of ecosystem health, the intestinal biome of healthier, socially dominant animals should be more diverse than those of subordinates. Gradual colonization of the juvenile intestine after birth predicts lower intestinal biome diversity in juveniles than adults. We tested these predictions on the effect of: (1) age (juvenile/adult) and (2) social status (low/high) on bacterial microbiome and eukaryome diversity and composition in the spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta), a highly social, female-dominated carnivore in which social status determines access to resources. We comprehensively screened feces from 35 individually known adult females and 7 juveniles in the Serengeti ecosystem for bacteria and eukaryotes, using a set of 48 different amplicons (4 for bacterial 16S, 44 for eukaryote 18S) in a multi-amplicon sequencing approach. We compared sequence abundances to classical coprological egg or oocyst counts. For all parasite taxa detected in more than six samples, the number of sequence reads significantly predicted the number of eggs or oocysts counted, underscoring the value of an amplicon sequencing approach for quantitative measurements of parasite load. In line with our predictions, our results revealed a significantly less diverse microbiome in juveniles than adults and a significantly higher diversity of eukaryotes in high-ranking than low-ranking animals. We propose that free-ranging wildlife can provide an intriguing model system to assess the adaptive value of intestinal biome diversity for both bacteria and eukaryotes.eng
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 4.0) Attribution 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjecteukaryotomeeng
dc.subjecteukaryomeeng
dc.subjectparasiteseng
dc.subjectamplicon sequencingeng
dc.subjectspotted hyenaeng
dc.subjectsocial statuseng
dc.subjectbacterial microbiomeeng
dc.subjectage classeseng
dc.subject.ddc610 Medizin und Gesundheitnone
dc.titleThe Intestinal Eukaryotic and Bacterial Biome of Spotted Hyenas: The Impact of Social Status and Age on Diversity and Compositionnone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/21291-7
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fcimb.2017.00262none
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/20566
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titleFrontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiologynone
local.edoc.pages17none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.institutionLebenswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameFrontiers Media S.A.none
local.edoc.container-publisher-placeLausannenone
local.edoc.container-volume7none
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
local.edoc.container-articlenumber262none
dc.identifier.eissn2235-2988

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