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2018-09-10Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.3389/fpls.2018.01329
Arbuscular Mycorrhizas: A Promising Component of Plant Production Systems Provided Favorable Conditions for Their Growth
dc.contributor.authorBitterlich, Michael
dc.contributor.authorRouphael, Youssef
dc.contributor.authorGraefe, Jan
dc.contributor.authorFranken, Philipp
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-13T12:09:24Z
dc.date.available2020-02-13T12:09:24Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-10none
dc.date.updated2019-10-22T06:22:47Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/21882
dc.description.abstractArbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have become an attractive target as biostimulants in agriculture due to their known contributions to plant nutrient uptake and abiotic stress tolerance. However, inoculation with AM fungi can result in depressed, unchanged, or stimulated plant growth, which limits security of application in crop production systems. Crop production comprises high diversity and variability in atmospheric conditions, substrates, plant species, and more. In this review, we emphasize that we need integrative approaches for studying mycorrhizal symbioses in order to increase the predictability of growth outcomes and security of implementation of AM fungi into crop production. We briefly review known mechanisms of AM on nutrient uptake and drought tolerance of plants, on soil structure and soil hydraulic properties. We carve out that an important factor for both nutrient availability and drought tolerance is yet not well understood; the AM effects on soil hydraulic properties. We gave special emphasis to circular references between atmospheric conditions, soil hydraulic properties and plant nutrient and water uptake. We stress that interdisciplinary approaches are needed that account for a variability of atmospheric conditions and, how this would match to mycorrhizal functions and demands in a way that increased plant nutrient and water uptake can be effectively used for physiological processes and ultimately growth. Only with integrated analyses under a wide range of growing conditions, we will be able to make profound decisions whether or not to use AM in particular crop production systems or can adjust culture conditions in ways that AM plants thrive.eng
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 4.0) Attribution 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectarbuscular mycorrhizaeng
dc.subjectsoil hydraulic propertieseng
dc.subjectplant productioneng
dc.subjectenvironmenteng
dc.subjectatmospheric conditionseng
dc.subject.ddc570 Biowissenschaften; Biologienone
dc.titleArbuscular Mycorrhizas: A Promising Component of Plant Production Systems Provided Favorable Conditions for Their Growthnone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/21882-8
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpls.2018.01329none
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/21134
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titleFrontiers in Plant Sciencenone
local.edoc.pages6none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.institutionLebenswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameFrontiers Media S.A.none
local.edoc.container-publisher-placeLausannenone
local.edoc.container-volume9none
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
local.edoc.container-articlenumber1329none
dc.identifier.eissn1664-462X
local.edoc.affiliationBitterlich, Michael; Department of Plant-Microbe Interactions, Leibniz-Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops e.V., Großbeeren, Germanynone
local.edoc.affiliationRouphael, Youssef; Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italynone
local.edoc.affiliationGraefe, Jan; Department of Plant-Microbe Interactions, Leibniz-Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops e.V., Großbeeren, Germanynone
local.edoc.affiliationFranken, Philipp; Department of Plant-Microbe Interactions, Leibniz-Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops e.V., Großbeeren, Germany; Department of Plant Physiology, Institute of Biology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germanynone

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