Show simple item record

2020-01-11Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.18452/21282
Generalist Eimeria species in rodents
dc.contributor.authorJarquín-Díaz, Víctor Hugo
dc.contributor.authorBalard, Alice
dc.contributor.authorMácová, Anna
dc.contributor.authorJost, Jenny
dc.contributor.authorRoth von Szepesbéla, Tabea
dc.contributor.authorBerktold, Karin
dc.contributor.authorTank, Steffen
dc.contributor.authorKvičerová, Jana
dc.contributor.authorHeitlinger, Emanuel
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-11T14:23:57Z
dc.date.available2020-03-11T14:23:57Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-11none
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/22028
dc.descriptionThis article was supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the Open Access Publication Fund of Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.
dc.description.abstractIntracellular parasites of the genus Eimeria are described as tissue/host-specific. Phylogenetic classification of rodent Eimeria suggested that some species have a broader host range than previously assumed. We explore whether Eimeria spp. infecting house mice are misclassified by the most widely used molecular markers due to a lack of resolution, or whether, instead, these parasite species are indeed infecting multiple host species. With the commonly used markers (18S/COI), we recovered monophyletic clades of E. falciformis and E. vermiformis from Mus that included E. apionodes identified in other rodent host species (Apodemus spp., Myodes glareolus, and Microtus arvalis). A lack of internal resolution in these clades could suggest the existence of a species complex with a wide host range infecting murid and cricetid rodents. We question, however, the power of COI and 18S markers to provide adequate resolution for assessing host specificity. In addition to the rarely used marker ORF470 from the apicoplast genome, we present multilocus genotyping as an alternative approach. Phylogenetic analysis of 35 nuclear markers differentiated E. falciformis from house mice from isolates from Apodemus hosts. Isolates of E. vermiformis from Mus are still found in clusters interspersed with non-Mus isolates, even with this high-resolution data. In conclusion, we show that species-level resolution should not be assumed for COI and 18S markers in coccidia. Host–parasite cospeciation at shallow phylogenetic nodes, as well as contemporary coccidian host ranges more generally, is still open questions that need to be addressed using novel genetic markers with higher resolution.eng
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 4.0) Attribution 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject18Seng
dc.subjectCOIeng
dc.subjectEimeriaeng
dc.subjectmultilocus sequence typingeng
dc.subjectphylogeneticseng
dc.subjectrodentseng
dc.subject.ddc570 Biologienone
dc.titleGeneralist Eimeria species in rodentsnone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/22028-9
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/21282
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.pages12none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
dc.identifier.eissn2045-7758
dc.title.subtitleMultilocus analyses indicate inadequate resolution of established markersnone
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.doi10.1002/ece3.5992
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.journaltitleEcology and evolutionnone
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.volume10none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.issue3none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.originalpublishernameJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.pagestart1378none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.pageend1389none
bua.departmentLebenswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone

Show simple item record