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2010-12Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.18452/21567
The Dark Side of Light
dc.contributor.authorHölker, Franz
dc.contributor.authorMoss, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorGriefahn, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorKloas, Werner
dc.contributor.authorVoigt, Christian C.
dc.contributor.authorHenckel, Dietrich
dc.contributor.authorHänel, Andreas
dc.contributor.authorKappeler, Peter M.
dc.contributor.authorVölker, Stephan
dc.contributor.authorSchwope, Axel
dc.contributor.authorFranke, Steffen
dc.contributor.authorUhrlandt, Dirk
dc.contributor.authorFischer, Jürgen
dc.contributor.authorKlenke, Reinhard
dc.contributor.authorWolter, Christian
dc.contributor.authorTockner, Klement
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-14T11:07:04Z
dc.date.available2020-07-14T11:07:04Z
dc.date.issued2010-12none
dc.identifier.other10.5751/ES-03685-150413
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/22327
dc.description.abstractAlthough the invention and widespread use of artificial light is clearly one of the most important human technological advances, the transformation of nightscapes is increasingly recognized as having adverse effects. Night lighting may have serious physiological consequences for humans, ecological and evolutionary implications for animal and plant populations, and may reshape entire ecosystems. However, knowledge on the adverse effects of light pollution is vague. In response to climate change and energy shortages, many countries, regions, and communities are developing new lighting programs and concepts with a strong focus on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions. Given the dramatic increase in artificial light at night (0 - 20% per year, depending on geographic region), we see an urgent need for light pollution policies that go beyond energy efficiency to include human well-being, the structure and functioning of ecosystems, and inter-related socioeconomic consequences. Such a policy shift will require a sound transdisciplinary understanding of the significance of the night, and its loss, for humans and the natural systems upon which we depend. Knowledge is also urgently needed on suitable lighting technologies and concepts which are ecologically, socially, and economically sustainable. Unless managing darkness becomes an integral part of future conservation and lighting policies, modern society may run into a global self-experiment with unpredictable outcomes.eng
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY-NC 4.0) Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectartificial lighteng
dc.subjectenergy efficiencyeng
dc.subjectlighting concepteng
dc.subjectlight pollutioneng
dc.subjectnightscapeeng
dc.subjectpolicyeng
dc.subjectsustainabilityeng
dc.subjecttransdisciplinaryeng
dc.subject.ddc333.7 Natürliche Resourcen, Energie und Umweltnone
dc.titleThe Dark Side of Lightnone
dc.typearticle
dc.subtitleA Transdisciplinary Research Agenda for Light Pollution Policynone
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/22327-0
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/21567
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titleEcology and Societynone
local.edoc.pages11none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.institutionIntegrative Forschungsinstitutenone
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameResilience Alliancenone
local.edoc.container-publisher-placeWolfville, Nova Scotianone
local.edoc.container-volume15none
local.edoc.container-issue4none
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
local.edoc.container-articlenumber13none

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