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2018-05-21Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.18452/21687
The Office of the Crown
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Jason Grant
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-12T11:08:01Z
dc.date.available2020-08-12T11:08:01Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-21none
dc.identifier.other10.1017/S0008197318000338
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/22408
dc.description.abstractA troubling veil of mystery still shrouds the central institution of the British Constitution – the Crown. In this paper, I examine the modern utility of five historical doctrines: the doctrine of the “King's two bodies”; the doctrine that the Crown is a “corporation sole”; the doctrine that the King can “do no wrong”; the doctrine that (high) public offices are “emanations” of the Crown; and the doctrine that the Crown is “one and indivisible”. Using some insights from social ontology, the history of office in the Western legal tradition, and the sociology of role and status, I argue that the first four of these doctrines can be refashioned into a conception of the Crown as an office. An office is an enduring institutional entity to which individuals bear a relationship from time to time, but which is separate from any individual incumbent and is to be considered in legal analysis as a separate acting subject. Using the logic of office, official personality and official action, I distinguish between the Queen, the Crown, Her Majesty's Government and the Commonwealth and argue that together they provide a serviceable model of the modern British Constitution. The final doctrine, however, must be abandoned – the Crown is plural and divisible and this must be taken into account when using the Crown to reason about the UK's relationship to other constitutional orders.eng
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectCrowneng
dc.subjectofficeeng
dc.subjectexecutive governmenteng
dc.subjectstate theoryeng
dc.subjectCommonwealtheng
dc.subjectBritish Empireeng
dc.subject.ddc321 Staatsformen und Regierungssystemenone
dc.subject.ddc340 Rechtnone
dc.titleThe Office of the Crownnone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/22408-0
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/21687
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titleThe Cambridge Law Journalnone
local.edoc.pages23none
local.edoc.anmerkungThis publication is with permission of the rights owner freely accessible due to an Alliance licence and a national licence (funded by the DFG, German Research Foundation) respectively.none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.institutionSonstige Einrichtungen der Universitätnone
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameCambridge Univ. Pressnone
local.edoc.container-publisher-placeCambridgenone
local.edoc.container-volume77none
local.edoc.container-issue2none
local.edoc.container-year2018none
local.edoc.container-firstpage298none
local.edoc.container-lastpage320none
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
dc.identifier.eissn1469-2139

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