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2020-08-19Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.3390/brainsci10090569
Fatigue in Cancer and Neuroinflammatory and Autoimmune Disease: CNS Arousal Matters
dc.contributor.authorUlke, Christine
dc.contributor.authorSurova, Galina
dc.contributor.authorSander, Christian
dc.contributor.authorEngel, Christoph
dc.contributor.authorWirkner, Kerstin
dc.contributor.authorJawinski, Philippe
dc.contributor.authorHensch, Tilman
dc.contributor.authorHegerl, Ulrich
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-14T07:47:18Z
dc.date.available2020-09-14T07:47:18Z
dc.date.issued2020-08-19none
dc.date.updated2020-09-02T21:58:11Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/22614
dc.description.abstractThe term fatigue is not only used to describe a sleepy state with a lack of drive, as observed in patients with chronic physical illnesses, but also a state with an inhibition of drive and central nervous system (CNS) hyperarousal, as frequently observed in patients with major depression. An electroencephalogram (EEG)-based algorithm has been developed to objectively assess CNS arousal and to disentangle these pathophysiologically heterogeneous forms of fatigue. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that fatigued patients with CNS hyperarousal score higher on depressive symptoms than those without this neurophysiological pattern. Methods: Subjects with fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory sum-score > 40) in the context of cancer, neuroinflammatory, or autoimmune diseases were drawn from the 60+ cohort of the Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases. CNS arousal was assessed by automatic EEG-vigilance stage classification using the Vigilance Algorithm Leipzig (VIGALL 2.1) based on 20 min EEG recordings at rest with eyes closed. Depression was assessed by the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-SR). Results: Sixty participants (33 female; median age: 67.5 years) were included in the analysis. As hypothesized, fatigued patients with CNS hyperarousal had higher IDS-SR scores than those without hyperarousal (F1,58 = 18.34; p < 0.0001, η2 = 0.240). Conclusion: hyperaroused fatigue in patients with chronic physical illness may be a sign of comorbid depression.eng
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 4.0) Attribution 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectdepressioneng
dc.subjectfatigueeng
dc.subjectelectroencephalographyeng
dc.subjecthyperarousaleng
dc.subjectneurophysiologyeng
dc.subject.ddc570 Biologienone
dc.titleFatigue in Cancer and Neuroinflammatory and Autoimmune Disease: CNS Arousal Mattersnone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/22614-4
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/brainsci10090569none
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titleBrain Sciencesnone
local.edoc.pages10none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.institutionLebenswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameMDPInone
local.edoc.container-publisher-placeBaselnone
local.edoc.container-volume10none
local.edoc.container-issue9none
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
local.edoc.container-articlenumber569none
dc.identifier.eissn2076-3425
local.edoc.affiliationUlke, Christine; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Leipzig University Medical Center, Semmelweisstrasse 10, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany, christine.ulke@medizin.uni-leipzig.de LIFE—Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases, University of Leipzig, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany, christine.ulke@medizin.uni-leipzig.denone
local.edoc.affiliationSurova, Galina; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Leipzig University Medical Center, Semmelweisstrasse 10, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany, surova_galina@rambler.runone
local.edoc.affiliationSander, Christian; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Leipzig University Medical Center, Semmelweisstrasse 10, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany, Christian.Sander@medizin.uni-leipzig.de LIFE—Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases, University of Leipzig, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany, Christian.Sander@medizin.uni-leipzig.denone
local.edoc.affiliationEngel, Christoph; LIFE—Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases, University of Leipzig, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany, christoph.engel@imise.uni-leipzig.denone
local.edoc.affiliationWirkner, Kerstin; LIFE—Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases, University of Leipzig, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany, kwirkner@life.uni-leipzig.denone
local.edoc.affiliationJawinski, Philippe; LIFE—Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases, University of Leipzig, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany, philippe.jawinski@hu-berlin.de Department of Psychology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, 10099 Berlin, Germany, philippe.jawinski@hu-berlin.denone
local.edoc.affiliationHensch, Tilman; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Leipzig University Medical Center, Semmelweisstrasse 10, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany, Tilman.Hensch@medizin.uni-leipzig.de LIFE—Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases, University of Leipzig, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany, Tilman.Hensch@medizin.uni-leipzig.de Department of Psychology, IUBH International University, 99084 Erfurt, Germany, Tilman.Hensch@medizin.uni-leipzig.denone
local.edoc.affiliationHegerl, Ulrich; Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, 60323 Frankfurt, Germany, Ulrich.Hegerl@kgu.denone

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