Show simple item record

2020-08-13Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.3390/pathogens9080652
Comparison of Coxiella burnetii Excretion between Sheep and Goats Naturally Infected with One Cattle-Associated Genotype
dc.contributor.authorBauer, Benjamin
dc.contributor.authorPrüfer, Louise
dc.contributor.authorWalter, Mathias
dc.contributor.authorGanter, Isabel
dc.contributor.authorFrangoulidis, Dimitrios
dc.contributor.authorRunge, Martin
dc.contributor.authorGanter, Martin
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-18T12:14:34Z
dc.date.available2020-09-18T12:14:34Z
dc.date.issued2020-08-13none
dc.date.updated2020-09-02T23:01:31Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/22640
dc.description.abstractThe main reservoir of Coxiella (C.) burnetii are ruminants. They shed the pathogen through birth products, vaginal mucus, faeces and milk. A direct comparison of C. burnetii excretions between naturally infected sheep and goats was performed on the same farm to investigate species-specific differences. The animals were vaccinated with an inactivated C. burnetii phase I vaccine at the beginning of the study period for public health reasons. Vaginal and rectal swabs along with milk specimens were taken monthly during the lambing period and once again at the next lambing season. To estimate the environmental contamination of the animals’ housings, nasal swabs from every animal were taken simultaneously. Moreover, dust samples from the windowsills and straw beddings were collected. All samples were examined by qPCR targeting the IS1111 gene and the MLVA/VNTR typing method was performed. Whole genome sequencing was applied to determine the number of IS1111 copies followed by a calculation of C. burnetii genome equivalents of each sample. The cattle-associated genotype C7 was detected containing 29 IS1111 copies. Overall, goats seem to shed more C. burnetii through vaginal mucus and in particular shed more and for longer via the rectal route than sheep. This is supported by the larger quantities of C. burnetii DNA detected in caprine nasal swabs and environmental samples compared to the ovine ones. Transmission of C. burnetii from cattle to small ruminants must also be considered.eng
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 4.0) Attribution 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject<i>Coxiella burnetii</i>eng
dc.subjectsheepeng
dc.subjectgoateng
dc.subjectcattleeng
dc.subjectenvironmental contaminationeng
dc.subjectnasal swabseng
dc.subjectwhole genome sequencingeng
dc.subjectMLVA/VNTReng
dc.subjectQ fevereng
dc.subjectzoonosiseng
dc.subject.ddc570 Biologienone
dc.subject.ddc610 Medizin und Gesundheitnone
dc.titleComparison of Coxiella burnetii Excretion between Sheep and Goats Naturally Infected with One Cattle-Associated Genotypenone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/22640-8
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/pathogens9080652none
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/21949
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titlePathogensnone
local.edoc.pages15none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.institutionLebenswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameMDPInone
local.edoc.container-publisher-placeBaselnone
local.edoc.container-volume9none
local.edoc.container-issue8none
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
local.edoc.container-articlenumber652none
dc.identifier.eissn2076-0817
local.edoc.affiliationBauer, Benjamin; Clinic for Swine and Small Ruminants, Forensic Medicine and Ambulatory Service, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Bischofsholer Damm 15, 30173 Hannover, Germany, benjamin.bauer@tiho-hannover.denone
local.edoc.affiliationPrüfer, Louise; Lower Saxony State Office for Consumer Protection and Food Safety (LAVES), Food and Veterinary Institute Braunschweig/Hannover, Eintrachtweg 17, 30173 Hannover, Germany, Louise.Pruefer@LAVES.Niedersachsen.denone
local.edoc.affiliationWalter, Mathias; Bundeswehr Institute of Microbiology, Neuherbergstraße 11, 80937 Munich, Germany, mathiaswalter@instmikrobiobw.denone
local.edoc.affiliationGanter, Isabel; Department of Psychology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin, Germany, Ganteris@hu-berlin.denone
local.edoc.affiliationFrangoulidis, Dimitrios; Bundeswehr Institute of Microbiology, Neuherbergstraße 11, 80937 Munich, Germany, DimitriosFrangoulidis@instmikrobiobw.de Bundeswehr Medical Service Headquarters VI-2, Medical Intelligence & Information (MI2), Dachauer Straße 128, 80637 Munich, Germany, DimitriosFrangoulidis@instmikrobiobw.denone
local.edoc.affiliationRunge, Martin; Lower Saxony State Office for Consumer Protection and Food Safety (LAVES), Food and Veterinary Institute Braunschweig/Hannover, Eintrachtweg 17, 30173 Hannover, Germany, Martin.Runge@LAVES.Niedersachsen.denone
local.edoc.affiliationGanter, Martin; Clinic for Swine and Small Ruminants, Forensic Medicine and Ambulatory Service, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Bischofsholer Damm 15, 30173 Hannover, Germany, martin.ganter@tiho-hannover.denone

Show simple item record