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2020-01-30Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.3390/su12030998
Exploring Farmers’ Perceptions of Agricultural Technologies: A Case Study from Tanzania
dc.contributor.authorJha, Srijna
dc.contributor.authorKaechele, Harald
dc.contributor.authorLana, Marcos
dc.contributor.authorAmjath-Babu, T.S
dc.contributor.authorSieber, Stefan
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-07T11:09:03Z
dc.date.available2020-10-07T11:09:03Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-30none
dc.date.updated2020-03-06T15:58:39Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/22702
dc.description.abstractThe low agricultural productivity of key crops and food insecurity continue to be key issues in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and Tanzania. The growing population, depleting resources, and changing climate further amplify these issues. Globally, many agricultural technologies (AgTs) are available as pathways for improved agricultural productivity and food security, however, they have had relatively little success in SSA and Tanzania. This is because the uptake of AgTs is a complex process, which is highly localized, involving multiple actors, stages, and spatial and time dimensions. Smallholder farmers often experience issues of sustainability, constraints for adoption, and scaling-up throughout the uptake process of AgTs, all of which vary by region. This indicates a need for a systematic and simultaneous understanding of sustainability, constraints for adoption, and scaling-up of AgTs to better guide agricultural strategy and policy interventions in SSA and Tanzania. Moreover, in order to understand the local settings better, a consideration of the perceptions of the farmers themselves, who are the primary actors in the uptake process of AgTs, is key. Acknowledging this, the study takes on a case study approach, using the scaling-up assessment (ScalA) method and three focus group discussions with a total of 44 smallholder farmers to systematically and simultaneously assess the sustainability, constraints for adoption, and scaling-up of three AgTs (use of fertilizers, improved seeds, and small-scale irrigation) in Tanzania. The study finds that the farmers perceive all three AgTs to be sustainable for the study region. Adoption rates are perceived to be medium for use of fertilizers, high for improved seeds, and low for small-scale irrigation. The most significant constraints for adoption experienced by the farmers are lack of technical physical inputs, marketing facilities, and know-how. Scaling-up is perceived to be well fulfilled for use of fertilizers and improved seeds, but only partially fulfilled for small-scale irrigation, which is the most limited of the three AgTs. The most significant constraints for scaling-up experienced by farmers are a lack of confidence in the added value of the AgTs beyond project activities, marketing facilities, and technical physical inputs. The overall success potential is high for the use of fertilizers and improved seeds, and the average for small-scale irrigation. The farmers’ perceptions partially indicate why the bundle of AgTs is lacking in the study region and provide a basis for discussing targeted agricultural and policy interventions in Tanzania.eng
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 4.0) Attribution 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectsustainabilityeng
dc.subjectadoptioneng
dc.subjectscaling-upeng
dc.subjectagricultural technologieseng
dc.subjectfarmer perceptionseng
dc.subjectagricultural productivityeng
dc.subjectfood securityeng
dc.subjectTanzaniaeng
dc.subject.ddc333.7 Natürliche Resourcen, Energie und Umweltnone
dc.subject.ddc690 Bau von Gebäudennone
dc.titleExploring Farmers’ Perceptions of Agricultural Technologies: A Case Study from Tanzanianone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/22702-2
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/su12030998none
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/22021
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titleSustainabilitynone
local.edoc.pages21none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.institutionLebenswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameMDPInone
local.edoc.container-publisher-placeBaselnone
local.edoc.container-volume12none
local.edoc.container-issue3none
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
local.edoc.container-articlenumber998none
dc.identifier.eissn2071-1050
local.edoc.affiliationJha, Srijna; Sustainable Land Use in Developing Countries (SusLAND), Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Eberswalder Straße 84, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany, srijna.jha@zalf.de Department of Agricultural Economics, Faculty of Life Sciences Thaer-Institute, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin, Germany, srijna.jha@zalf.denone
local.edoc.affiliationKaechele, Harald; Sustainable Land Use in Developing Countries (SusLAND), Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Eberswalder Straße 84, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany, harald.kaechele@zalf.de Department of Environmental Economics, Eberswalde University for Sustainable Development (HNEE), Schickler Straße 5, 16225 Eberswalde, Germany, harald.kaechele@zalf.denone
local.edoc.affiliationLana, Marcos; Sustainable Land Use in Developing Countries (SusLAND), Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Eberswalder Straße 84, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany, marcos.lana@slu.se Department of Crop Production Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7044, 760 07 Uppsala, Sweden, marcos.lana@slu.senone
local.edoc.affiliationAmjath-Babu, T.S; Sustainable Land Use in Developing Countries (SusLAND), Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Eberswalder Straße 84, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany, amjath.babu@zalf.de CIMMYT, Dhaka, Bangladesh, amjath.babu@zalf.denone
local.edoc.affiliationSieber, Stefan; Sustainable Land Use in Developing Countries (SusLAND), Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Eberswalder Straße 84, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany, stefan.sieber@zalf.de Department of Agricultural Economics, Faculty of Life Sciences Thaer-Institute, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin, Germany, stefan.sieber@zalf.denone

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