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2020-10-28Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.18452/22172
Vertical Root Distribution of Different Cover Crops Determined with the Profile Wall Method
dc.contributor.authorKemper, Roman
dc.contributor.authorBublitz, Tábata A.
dc.contributor.authorMüller, Phillip
dc.contributor.authorKautz, Timo
dc.contributor.authorDöring, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorAthmann, Miriam
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-20T10:38:12Z
dc.date.available2020-11-20T10:38:12Z
dc.date.issued2020-10-28none
dc.identifier.other10.3390/agriculture10110503
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/22797
dc.description.abstractMany benefits of cover crops such as prevention of nitrate leaching, erosion reduction, soil organic carbon enhancement and improvement of soil structure are associated with roots. However, including root characteristics as a criterion for cover crop selection requires more knowledge on their root growth dynamics. Seven cover crop species (crimson clover, winter rye, bristle oats, blue lupin, oil radish, winter turnip rape and phacelia) were grown in a two-year organically managed field experiment in Germany to screen them for root intensity and vertical root distribution. Root length density (RLD) and proportion of root length in large-sized biopores were determined before and after winter with the profile wall method. RLD and cumulative root length were analysed using a three-parameter logistic function, and a logistic dose-response function, respectively. Fibrous rooted winter rye and crimson clover showed high RLD in topsoil and had a shallow cumulative root distribution. Their RLD increased further during winter in topsoil and subsoil. The crops with the highest RLD in the subsoil were taprooted oil radish, winter turnip rape and phacelia. Bristle oat had intermediate features. Blue lupin had low RLD in topsoil and subsoil. Phacelia, oil radish, winter turnip rape and bristle oat showed the highest share of root length in biopores. These complementary root characteristics suggest that combining cover crops of different root types in intercropping may be used to enhance overall RLD for maximizing cover crop benefitseng
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 4.0) Attribution 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectroot length densityeng
dc.subjectbelow-groundeng
dc.subjectbioporeeng
dc.subjectcatch cropeng
dc.subjectcumulative root distributioneng
dc.subjectlegumeeng
dc.subject.ddc570 Biowissenschaften; Biologienone
dc.titleVertical Root Distribution of Different Cover Crops Determined with the Profile Wall Methodnone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/22797-7
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/22172
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titleAgriculturenone
local.edoc.pages17none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.institutionLebenswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameMDPI AGnone
local.edoc.container-publisher-placeBaselnone
local.edoc.container-volume10none
local.edoc.container-issue11none
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
local.edoc.container-articlenumber503none
dc.identifier.eissn2077-0472

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