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2020-02Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.1177/0023677219879455
Wheel running behaviour in group-housed female mice indicates disturbed wellbeing due to DSS colitis
dc.contributor.authorWeegh, Nora
dc.contributor.authorFüner, Jonas
dc.contributor.authorJanke, Oliver
dc.contributor.authorWinter, York
dc.contributor.authorJung, Christian
dc.contributor.authorStruve, Birgitta
dc.contributor.authorWassermann, Laura
dc.contributor.authorLewejohann, Lars
dc.contributor.authorBleich, André
dc.contributor.authorHäger, Christine
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-17T12:06:02Z
dc.date.available2021-02-17T12:06:02Z
dc.date.issued2020-02none
dc.date.updated2020-05-02T18:12:12Z
dc.identifier.issn0023-6772
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/23102
dc.description.abstractVoluntary wheel running (VWR) behaviour is a sensitive indicator of disturbed wellbeing and used for the assessment of individual experimental severity levels in laboratory mice. However, monitoring individual VWR performance usually requires single housing, which itself might have a negative effect on wellbeing. In consideration of the 3Rs principle, VWR behaviour was evaluated under group-housing conditions. To test the applicability for severity assessment, this readout was evaluated in a dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) induced colitis model. For continuous monitoring, an automated system with integrated radio-frequency identification technology was used, enabling detection of individual VWR. After a 14-day adaptation period mice demonstrated a stable running performance. Analysis during DSS treatment in combination with repeated facial vein phlebotomy and faecal sampling procedure resulted in significantly reduced VWR behaviour during the course of colitis and increased VWR during disease recovery. Mice submitted to phlebotomy and faecal sampling but no DSS treatment showed less reduced VWR but a longer-lasting recovery. Application of a cluster model discriminating individual severity levels based on VWR and body weight data revealed the highest severity level in most of the DSS-treated mice on day 7, but a considerable number of control mice also showed elevated severity levels due to sampling procedures alone. In summary, VWR sensitively indicated the course of DSS colitis severity and the impact of sample collection. Therefore, monitoring of VWR is a suitable method for the detection of disturbed wellbeing due to DSS colitis and sampling procedure in group-housed female laboratory mice.eng
dc.description.sponsorshipFederal Ministry of Economics and Energy, "Zentrales Innovationsprogramm Mittelstand (ZIM)
dc.description.sponsorshipDeutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft https://doi.org/https://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001659
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subject3Rseng
dc.subjectbehavioureng
dc.subjectethics and welfareeng
dc.subjecthousingeng
dc.subjectsocial behavioureng
dc.subjectwellbeingeng
dc.subjectwheel runningeng
dc.subject.ddc590 Tiere (Zoologie)none
dc.subject.ddc610 Medizin und Gesundheitnone
dc.titleWheel running behaviour in group-housed female mice indicates disturbed wellbeing due to DSS colitisnone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/23102-3
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0023677219879455none
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/22492
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titleLaboratory Animalsnone
local.edoc.pages10none
local.edoc.anmerkungThis publication is with permission of the rights owner freely accessible due to an Alliance licence and a national licence (funded by the DFG, German Research Foundation) respectively.none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.institutionLebenswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameSAGE Publicationsnone
local.edoc.container-publisher-placeLondonnone
local.edoc.container-volume54none
local.edoc.container-issue1none
local.edoc.container-firstpage63none
local.edoc.container-lastpage72none
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
dc.identifier.eissn1758-1117
local.edoc.affiliationWeegh, Nora; Institute for Laboratory Animal Science, Hannover Medical School, Germanynone
local.edoc.affiliationFüner, Jonas; preclinics, Potsdam, Germanynone
local.edoc.affiliationJanke, Oliver; preclinics, Potsdam, Germanynone
local.edoc.affiliationWinter, York; Institute of Biology, Humboldt University, Berlinnone
local.edoc.affiliationJung, Christian; PhenoSys, Berlin, Germanynone
local.edoc.affiliationStruve, Birgitta; Institute for Laboratory Animal Science, Hannover Medical School, Germanynone
local.edoc.affiliationWassermann, Laura; Institute for Laboratory Animal Science, Hannover Medical School, Germanynone
local.edoc.affiliationLewejohann, Lars; German Centre for the Protection of Laboratory Animals (Bf3R), German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Berlin, Germanynone
local.edoc.affiliationBleich, André; Institute for Laboratory Animal Science, Hannover Medical School, Germanynone
local.edoc.affiliationHäger, Christine; Institute for Laboratory Animal Science, Hannover Medical School, Germanynone

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