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2021-05-17Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.1177/08902070211014029
Distinguishing simple and residual consistencies in functionally equivalent and non-equivalent situations: Evidence from experimental and observational longitudinal data
dc.contributor.authorHorstmann, Kai Tobias
dc.contributor.authorRauthmann, John F.
dc.contributor.authorSherman, Ryne A.
dc.contributor.authorZiegler, Matthias
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-14T09:22:47Z
dc.date.available2022-01-14T09:22:47Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-17none
dc.date.updated2021-12-06T04:59:37Z
dc.identifier.issn0890-2070
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/24575
dc.description.abstractThe current work examines consistencies of personality state scores across functionally equivalent and non-equivalent situations. We argue that simple consistency, defined as the correlation between state scores without taking people’s straits into account, needs to be distinguished from residual consistency that does account for traits. The existence of residual consistency reflects systematic interindividual differences in how people respond to situations, above and beyond what is expected from their traits. We examine the level and individual differences in all of these forms of consistency. In four micro-longitudinal studies (total N = 671), participants first provided trait self-ratings and then state ratings, either in response to two situation vignettes presented at separate testing occasions (Studies 1 and 2) or during experience sampling in daily life (Studies 3 and 4). In all studies, simple consistency was substantial, and the level of residual consistency varied with the level of functional equivalence of the situations. Further, individual differences in both simple and residual consistencies were only weakly correlated, suggesting no underlying general factor but only trait-specific consistencies. We conclude that there are consistent individual differences in how people respond to equivalent situations, even when their personality trait scores have been taken into account.eng
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.subjectTraitseng
dc.subjectstateseng
dc.subjectconsistencyeng
dc.subjectsituationseng
dc.subjectexperience samplingeng
dc.subject.ddc150 Psychologienone
dc.subject.ddc610 Medizin und Gesundheitnone
dc.titleDistinguishing simple and residual consistencies in functionally equivalent and non-equivalent situations: Evidence from experimental and observational longitudinal datanone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/24575-0
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/08902070211014029none
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/23944
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titleEuropean journal of personalitynone
local.edoc.pages28none
local.edoc.anmerkungThis publication is with permission of the rights owner freely accessible due to an alliance licence and a national licence (funded by the DFG, German Research Foundation) respectively.none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.institutionLebenswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameSage Publicationsnone
local.edoc.container-publisher-placeLondonnone
local.edoc.container-volume35none
local.edoc.container-issue6none
local.edoc.container-firstpage833none
local.edoc.container-lastpage860none
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
dc.identifier.eissn1099-0984
local.edoc.affiliationHorstmann, Kai T.: Institute of Psychology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germanynone
local.edoc.affiliationRauthmann, John F.: Institute of Psychology, University Bielefeld, Germanynone
local.edoc.affiliationSherman, Ryne A.: Hogan Assessments, USAnone
local.edoc.affiliationZiegler, Matthias: Institute of Psychology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germanynone

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