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2020-09-19Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.18452/24125
Identifying priority areas for restoring mountain ungulates in the Caucasus ecoregion
dc.contributor.authorKuemmerle, Tobias
dc.contributor.authorBluhm, Hendrik
dc.contributor.authorGhoddousi, Arash
dc.contributor.authorArakelyan, Marine
dc.contributor.authorAskerov, Elshad
dc.contributor.authorBleyhl, Benjamin
dc.contributor.authorGhasabian, Mamikon
dc.contributor.authorGavashelishvili, Alexander
dc.contributor.authorHeidelberg, Aurel
dc.contributor.authorMalkhasyan, Alexander
dc.contributor.authorManvelyan, Karen
dc.contributor.authorSoofi, Mahmood
dc.contributor.authorYarovenko, Yuriy
dc.contributor.authorWeinberg, Paul
dc.contributor.authorZazanashvili, Nugzar
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-09T15:09:54Z
dc.date.available2022-02-09T15:09:54Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-19none
dc.identifier.other10.1111/csp2.276
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/24777
dc.description.abstractMountain ungulates around the world have been decimated to small, fragmented populations. Restoring these species often is limited by inadequate information on where suitable habitat is found, and which restoration measures would help to increase and link existing populations. We developed an approach to spatially target threat-specific restoration actions and demonstrate it for bezoar goats (Capra aegagrus) in the Caucasus. Using a large occurrence dataset, we identified suitable habitat patches and evaluate them in terms of connectivity, protection status, and competition with other mountain ungulates. We found extant bezoar goat populations to be highly isolated, yet with widespread areas of suitable, unoccupied habitat between them. Many unoccupied habitat patches were well-connected to extant populations, were at least partly protected, and have low potential for competition with other Capra species. This signals substantial pressure on bezoar goats, likely due to poaching, which currently prevents natural recolonization. Our study shows how restoration planning is possible in the face of multiple threats and scarce data. For bezoar goats in the Caucasus, we pinpoint priority patches for specific restoration measures, including reintroductions and anti-poaching action. We highlight that many patches would benefit from multiple interventions and that transboundary restoration planning is needed, a situation likely similar for many mountain ungulates around the world.eng
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 4.0) Attribution 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectCapraeng
dc.subjectconservation planningeng
dc.subjectcorridorseng
dc.subjecthabitat restorationeng
dc.subjectmegafaunaeng
dc.subjectpoachingeng
dc.subjectpoachingeng
dc.subjectspecies distribution modelseng
dc.subject.ddc630 Landwirtschaft und verwandte Bereichenone
dc.titleIdentifying priority areas for restoring mountain ungulates in the Caucasus ecoregionnone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/24777-3
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/24125
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titleConservation science and practicenone
local.edoc.pages15none
local.edoc.anmerkungThis article was supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the Open Access Publication Fund of Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.institutionMathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultätnone
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameWileynone
local.edoc.container-publisher-placeHobokennone
local.edoc.container-volume2none
local.edoc.container-issue11none
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
local.edoc.container-articlenumbere276none
dc.identifier.eissn2578-4854

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