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2021-01-12Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.18452/24977
Into Your (S)Kin: Toward a Comprehensive Conception of Empathy
dc.contributor.authorSøvsø, Tue Emil Öhler
dc.contributor.authorBurckhardt, Kirstin
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-07T12:52:57Z
dc.date.available2022-07-07T12:52:57Z
dc.date.issued2021-01-12none
dc.date.updated2021-01-26T04:58:21Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/25664
dc.description.abstractThis paper argues for a comprehensive conception of empathy as comprising epistemic, affective, and motivational elements and introduces the ancient Stoic theory of attachment (Greek, oikeiōsis) as a model for describing the embodied, emotional response to others that we take to be distinctive of empathy. Our argument entails that in order to provide a suitable conceptual framework for the interdisciplinary study of empathy one must extend the scope of recent “simulationalist” and “enactivist” accounts of empathy in two important respects. First, against the enactivist assumption that human mindreading capacities primarily rely on an immediate, quasi-perceptual understanding of other’s intentional states, we draw on Alfred Schutz’ analysis of social understanding to argue that reflective types of understanding play a distinct, but equally fundamental role in empathic engagements. Second, we insist that empathy also involves an affective response toward the other and their situation (as the empathizer perceives this). We suggest analyzing this response in terms of the Stoic concepts of attachment, concern, and a fundamental type of prosocial motivation, that can best be described as an “extended partiality.” By way of conclusion, we integrate the above concepts into a comprehensive conceptual framework for the study of empathy and briefly relate them to current debates about empathic perception and prosocial motivation. The result, we argue, is an account that stays neutral with regard to the exact nature of the processes involved in producing empathy and can therefore accommodate discussion across theoretical divides—e.g., those between enactivist, simulationalist, and so-called theory-theorist approaches.eng
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 4.0) Attribution 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectempathyeng
dc.subjectstoicismeng
dc.subjectembodied cognitioneng
dc.subjectattachmenteng
dc.subjectphenomenologyeng
dc.subjectprosocial motivationeng
dc.subjectaffective intentionalityeng
dc.subject.ddc150 Psychologienone
dc.titleInto Your (S)Kin: Toward a Comprehensive Conception of Empathynone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/25664-9
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/24977
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.pages15none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
dc.identifier.eissn1664-1078
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2020.531688none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.journaltitleFrontiers in psychologynone
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.volume11none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.articlenumber531688none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.originalpublishernameFrontiers Research Foundationnone
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.originalpublisherplaceLausannenone
bua.departmentPhilosophische Fakultätnone

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