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2022-07-30Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.18452/25121
You Are What You Eat and So Is Our Planet: Identifying Dietary Groups Based on Personality and Environmentalism
dc.contributor.authorPalnau, Jan-Felix
dc.contributor.authorZiegler, Matthias
dc.contributor.authorLämmle, Lena
dc.contributor.editorTchounwou, Paul B.
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-10T10:48:11Z
dc.date.available2022-08-10T10:48:11Z
dc.date.issued2022-07-30none
dc.date.updated2022-08-03T14:35:56Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/25804
dc.description.abstractBehavioral change interventions promoting the reduction of animal product consumption are valuable tools to improve ecological sustainability as well as public health and help the mitigation of climate change. Recent findings revealed improved efficacy of interventions targeted at barriers (e.g., self-efficacy) of three different types of meat consumers over non-targeted interventions (e.g., completion of unrelated surveys). However, such interventions have yet to factor in the role of individual differences in personality. Therefore, in a first step, we performed segmentation analysis on barriers and benefits of reducing animal product consumption (e.g., meat attachment, environmentalism) with the inclusion of personality. In an online sample of N=1135 participants, latent profile analysis revealed five distinct dietary groups: “plant-based eaters”, “meat-reducers”, “medium-hindrance meat eaters”, “medium strong-hindrance meat eaters, and “strong-hindrance meat eaters”, based on inhibitors and facilitators of meat reduction. Groups differed in terms of consumption of different animal products (η2=0.08 to η2=0.80) as well as the Big Five (η2=0.08 to η2=0.80) and Dark Triad (η2=0.08 to η2=0.80). Strong-hindrance meat eaters were characterized by low Conscientiousness, Agreeableness, and Openness as well as high dark trait expression, implying new targets for future intervention design.eng
dc.description.sponsorshipMedical School Hamburg
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 4.0) Attribution 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectbehavioral change interventioneng
dc.subjectenvironmentalismeng
dc.subjectdark triadeng
dc.subjectBig Fiveeng
dc.subjectplant-based dieteng
dc.subjectmeat consumptioneng
dc.subjectmeat attachmenteng
dc.subjectfood neophobiaeng
dc.subjectconsumption orientationseng
dc.subjectsegmentation analysiseng
dc.subject.ddc150 Psychologienone
dc.titleYou Are What You Eat and So Is Our Planet: Identifying Dietary Groups Based on Personality and Environmentalismnone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/25804-6
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/25121
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.pages19none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
dc.identifier.eissn1660-4601
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.doi10.3390/ijerph19159354none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.journaltitleInternational journal of environmental research and public healthnone
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.volume19none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.issue15none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.articlenumber9354none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.originalpublishernameMDPInone
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.originalpublisherplaceBaselnone
bua.departmentLebenswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone

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