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2016-07-27Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/11/8/085001
Afforestation to mitigate climate change
dc.contributor.authorKreidenweis, Ulrich
dc.contributor.authorHumpenöder, Florian
dc.contributor.authorStevanović, Miodrag
dc.contributor.authorBodirsky, Benjamin Leon
dc.contributor.authorKriegler, Elmar
dc.contributor.authorLotze-Campen, Hermann
dc.contributor.authorPopp, Alexander
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-16T16:00:02Z
dc.date.available2022-08-16T16:00:02Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-27none
dc.date.updated2022-01-28T16:24:52Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/25843
dc.description.abstractAmbitious climate targets, such as the 2 °C target, are likely to require the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Afforestation is one such mitigation option but could, through the competition for land, also lead to food prices hikes. In addition, afforestation often decreases land-surface albedo and the amount of short-wave radiation reflected back to space, which results in a warming effect. In particular in the boreal zone, such biophysical warming effects following from afforestation are estimated to offset the cooling effect from carbon sequestration. We assessed the food price response of afforestation, and considered the albedo effect with scenarios in which afforestation was restricted to certain latitudinal zones. In our study, afforestation was incentivized by a globally uniform reward for carbon uptake in the terrestrial biosphere. This resulted in large-scale afforestation (2580 Mha globally) and substantial carbon sequestration (860 GtCO2) up to the end of the century. However, it was also associated with an increase in food prices of about 80% by 2050 and a more than fourfold increase by 2100. When afforestation was restricted to the tropics the food price response was substantially reduced, while still almost 60% cumulative carbon sequestration was achieved. In the medium term, the increase in prices was then lower than the increase in income underlying our scenario projections. Moreover, our results indicate that more liberalised trade in agricultural commodities could buffer the food price increases following from afforestation in tropical regions.eng
dc.description.sponsorshipSeventh Framework Programme http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100004963
dc.description.sponsorshipDeutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001659
dc.description.sponsorshipOpen Access Fund of the Leibniz Association
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 3.0) Attribution 3.0 Unportedger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subjectclimate engineeringeng
dc.subjectcarbon dioxide removaleng
dc.subjectafforestationeng
dc.subjectfood priceseng
dc.subjectalbedoeng
dc.subject.ddc577 Ökologienone
dc.titleAfforestation to mitigate climate changenone
dc.typearticle
dc.subtitleimpacts on food prices under consideration of albedo effectsnone
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/25843-3
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/1748-9326/11/8/085001none
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/25151
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titleEnvironmental research lettersnone
local.edoc.pages11none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.institutionLebenswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-publisher-nameIOP Publ.none
local.edoc.container-publisher-placeBristolnone
local.edoc.container-volume11none
local.edoc.container-issue8none
local.edoc.container-year2016none
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
local.edoc.container-articlenumber085001none
dc.identifier.eissn1748-9326

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