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2021-09-23Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.18452/27254
Polygenic risk for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) predicts brain response during working memory task in OCD, unaffected relatives, and healthy controls
dc.contributor.authorHeinzel, Stephan
dc.contributor.authorKaufmann, Christian
dc.contributor.authorGrützmann, Rosa
dc.contributor.authorKlawohn, Julia
dc.contributor.authorRiesel, Anja
dc.contributor.authorBey, Katharina
dc.contributor.authorHeilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie
dc.contributor.authorWeinhold, Leonie
dc.contributor.authorRamirez, Alfredo
dc.contributor.authorWagner, Michael
dc.contributor.authorKathmann, Norbert
dc.date.accessioned2023-09-04T13:56:30Z
dc.date.available2023-09-04T13:56:30Z
dc.date.issued2021-09-23none
dc.date.updated2023-03-28T08:32:07Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/27913
dc.description.abstractAlterations in frontal and parietal neural activations during working memory task performance have been suggested as a candidate endophenotype of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in studies involving first-degree relatives. However, the direct link between genetic risk for OCD and neuro-functional alterations during working memory performance has not been investigated to date. Thus, the aim of the current functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to test the direct association between polygenic risk for OCD and neural activity during the performance of a numeric n-back task with four working memory load conditions in 128 participants, including patients with OCD, unaffected first-degree relatives of OCD patients, and healthy controls. Behavioral results show a significant performance deficit at high working memory load in both patients with OCD and first-degree relatives (p < 0.05). A whole-brain analysis of the fMRI data indicated decreased neural activity in bilateral inferior parietal lobule and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in both patients and relatives. Most importantly, OCD polygenic risk scores predicted neural activity in orbitofrontal cortex. Results indicate that genetic risk for OCD can partly explain alterations in brain response during working memory performance, supporting the notion of a neuro-functional endophenotype for OCD.eng
dc.description.sponsorshipDeutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001659
dc.description.sponsorshipFreie Universität Berlin (1008)
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 4.0) Attribution 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectBiomarkerseng
dc.subjectGeneticseng
dc.subjectNeuroscienceeng
dc.subjectPsychologyeng
dc.subjectRisk factorseng
dc.subject.ddc150 Psychologienone
dc.titlePolygenic risk for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) predicts brain response during working memory task in OCD, unaffected relatives, and healthy controlsnone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/27913-6
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/27254
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.pages11none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.doi10.1038/s41598-021-98333-wnone
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.journaltitleScientific reportsnone
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.volume11none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.issue1none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.articlenumber18914none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.originalpublishernameNature Publishing Groupnone
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.originalpublisherplaceLondonnone
bua.departmentLebenswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone

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