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2023-02-22Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.18452/28164
Selection on an extreme-yet-conserved larval life-history strategy in a tapeworm
dc.contributor.authorBenesh, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2024-01-30T11:09:10Z
dc.date.available2024-01-30T11:09:10Z
dc.date.issued2023-02-22none
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/28815
dc.description.abstractEvolutionary stasis characterizes many phenotypes, even ones that seem suboptimal. Among tapeworms, Schistocephalus solidus and its relatives have some of the shortest developmental times in their first intermediate hosts, yet their development still seems excessively long considering they can grow faster, larger, and safer in the next hosts in their complex life cycles. I conducted 4 generations of selection on the developmental rate of S. solidus in its copepod first host, pushing a conserved-but-counterintuitive phenotype toward the limit of known tapeworm life-history strategies. Faster parasite development evolved and enabled earlier infectivity to the stickleback next host, but low heritability for infectivity moderated fitness gains. Fitness losses were more pronounced for slow-developing parasite families, irrespective of selection line, because directional selection released linked genetic variation for reduced infectivity to copepods, developmental stability, and fecundity. This deleterious variation is normally suppressed, implying development is canalized and thus under stabilizing selection. Nevertheless, faster development was not costly; fast-developing genotypes did not decrease copepod survival, even under host starvation, nor did they underperform in the next hosts, suggesting parasite stages in successive hosts are genetically decoupled. I speculate that, on longer time scales, the ultimate cost of abbreviated development is reduced size-dependent infectivity.eng
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 4.0) Attribution 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectadaptive decoupling hypothesiseng
dc.subjectcanalizationeng
dc.subjectexperimental evolutioneng
dc.subjectG matrixeng
dc.subjectgenetic asymmetryeng
dc.subjectvirulence tradeoffeng
dc.subject.ddc570 Biologienone
dc.titleSelection on an extreme-yet-conserved larval life-history strategy in a tapewormnone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/28815-4
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/28164
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.pages15none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
dc.identifier.eissn1558-5646
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.doi10.1093/evolut/qpad034
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.journaltitleEvolutionnone
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.volume77none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.issue5none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.originalpublishernameOxford University Pressnone
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.originalpublisherplaceOxfordnone
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.pagestart1188none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.pageend1202none
bua.departmentLebenswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone

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