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2024-02-20Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.18452/28570
Modeling the drivers of large herbivore distribution in human‐dominated southern African savannas
dc.contributor.authorRoque, Dionísio V.
dc.contributor.authorGöttert, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorZeller, Ulrich
dc.contributor.authorMacandza, Valério A.
dc.date.accessioned2024-04-23T17:11:56Z
dc.date.available2024-04-23T17:11:56Z
dc.date.issued2024-02-20none
dc.date.updated2024-04-16T08:22:42Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/29204
dc.description.abstractAfrican savanna ecosystems are home to the world's richest large herbivore (LH) assemblages. However, its landscapes are changing faster than any other region on Earth due to human activities and natural events. Therefore, understanding the factors influencing the distribution of LH in these human-dominated environments is crucial for decision-making on wildlife and habitat management. We combined ecological aerial surveys, camera trap, and dung count data to investigate how ecological (habitat types, perennial rivers, and rainfall) and anthropogenic (human settlements and cattle grazing areas) factors influence the distribution of LH species in Limpopo National Park (LNP). We used generalized linear models fitting binary logistic regression models to distinguish 25-km2 cells occupied (where the species were detected) by elephants (Loxodonta africana), buffalos (Syncerus caffer), zebras (Equus quagga), kudus (Tragelaphus strepsiceros), nyalas (Tragelaphus angasii), and impalas (Aepyceros melampus) from unoccupied regions (where the species were not detected) in the LNP landscape. We found that habitat type and rainfall were the most influential factors shaping the pattern of LH distribution in the LNP, except for elephants, whose prevalence was not associated with rainfall. The prevalence of zebras was positively associated with the proximity to perennial rivers, while kudus avoided these areas. While some species (zebras, kudus, and impalas) tended to avoid settlements, others (elephants, buffalos, and nyala) seemed attracted to settlements. Cattle grazing areas were the worst predictors of the distribution of all study species. Our results disclosed the role of ecological factors for the distribution of LH and showed that anthropogenic disturbances seemed to either (partially) prevent the occurrence of LH or show the potential for human–wildlife conflict risk in the study area. Therefore, the results highlight the need to investigate/quantify the potential human–wildlife conflict risk at finer spatial scales to improve future management.eng
dc.description.sponsorshipGerman Development Bank
dc.description.sponsorshipZwillenberg‐Tietz Foundation
dc.description.sponsorshipLimpopo National Park Administration
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY 4.0) Attribution 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectAfrican savanna ecosystemseng
dc.subjectbrowserseng
dc.subjectdistribution of large herbivoreseng
dc.subjectecological and anthropogenic factorseng
dc.subjectgrazerseng
dc.subjectLimpopo National Parkeng
dc.subjectmixed feederseng
dc.subject.ddc570 Biologienone
dc.titleModeling the drivers of large herbivore distribution in human‐dominated southern African savannasnone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/29204-9
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/28570
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.pages22none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
dc.identifier.eissn2150-8925
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.doi10.1002/ecs2.4770
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.journaltitleEcospherenone
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.volume15none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.issue2none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.articlenumbere4770none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.originalpublishernameESAnone
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.originalpublisherplaceIthaca, NYnone
bua.departmentLebenswissenschaftliche Fakultätnone

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