Show simple item record

2023-10-18Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.18452/28796
Comparative Raman spectroscopy of astrobiology relevant bio‐samples and planetary surface analogs under UV–VIS–IR excitation
dc.contributor.authorHanke, Franziska
dc.contributor.authorBöttger, Ute
dc.contributor.authorPohl, Andreas
dc.contributor.authorIrmscher, Klaus
dc.contributor.authorPavlov, Sergey G.
dc.date.accessioned2024-05-29T16:29:01Z
dc.date.available2024-05-29T16:29:01Z
dc.date.issued2023-10-18none
dc.date.updated2024-04-16T09:59:00Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/29382
dc.description.abstractWe investigated the potential of a laser selection in the broad optical range, from ultraviolet through visible to infrared (excitation wavelengths of 325, 532, 785, and 1064 nm) for combined analysis of Earth‐relevant extremophiles (Xanthoria elegans, Buellia frigida, and green alga of Circinaria gyrosa), carbohydrate molecules, as well as Mars and Moon surface regolith simulants as analog mineral mixtures (P‐MRS, S‐MRS, LRS, and JSC‐1). We show that the optimization of the laser photon energy provides (for at least one of the chosen excitation wavelengths) high‐end quality Raman spectra for each examined sample. In most cases, the infrared spectral range is advanced for biological samples, while an excitation in the visible and ultraviolet spectral range is often favorable or at least sufficient for accurate identification/resolution of mineral phases under the illuminated laser spot on the planetary surface simulants. Ultraviolet excitation does not always deliver significant contrast of the Raman Stokes responses to the induced photoluminescence in the studied biomolecules. Most prominent features in the Raman spectra of the biological samples are assigned to their specific pigments, also considered as biomolecular signatures of the extremophiles. The critical issue of specific advantages and limitations of each particular excitation source implies study for gaining scientific return from Raman spectroscopy for exobiological prospecting, for instance, the best trade between a single or dual excitation wavelength(s) for both biological and geological spectral data.eng
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
dc.rights(CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalger
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectexcitation wavelength photoluminescenceeng
dc.subjectextremophileseng
dc.subjectregolith simulantseng
dc.subjectspace explorationeng
dc.subject.ddc540 Chemie und zugeordnete Wissenschaftennone
dc.titleComparative Raman spectroscopy of astrobiology relevant bio‐samples and planetary surface analogs under UV–VIS–IR excitationnone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-110-18452/29382-0
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/28796
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.pages17none
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone
dc.identifier.eissn1097-4555
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.doi10.1002/jrs.6603
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.journaltitleJournal of Raman spectroscopynone
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.volume55none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.issue1none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.originalpublishernameWileynone
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.originalpublisherplaceChichester [u.a.]none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.pagestart26none
dcterms.bibliographicCitation.pageend42none
bua.departmentMathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultätnone

Show simple item record