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2012-02-02Buch DOI: 10.18452/4382
Total Work and Gender
dc.contributor.authorBurda, Michael
dc.contributor.authorHamermesh, Daniel S.
dc.contributor.authorWeil, Philippe
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-16T00:34:53Z
dc.date.available2017-06-16T00:34:53Z
dc.date.created2012-02-10
dc.date.issued2012-02-02
dc.date.submitted2012-02-02
dc.identifier.issn1860-5664
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/5034
dc.description.abstractTime-diary data from 27 countries show a negative relationship between real GDP per capita and female-male differences in total work time—work for pay and work at home. In rich non-Catholic countries on four continents men and women do about the same average amount of total work. Survey results demonstrate, however, that labor economists, macroeconomists, sociologists and the general public believe that women work more. The widespread average equality does not arise from gender differences in the price of time, from intra-family bargaining or from spousal complementarity. Several theories, including ones based on social norms, might explain these findings and are consistent with cross-national evidence from the World Values Surveys and sets of microeconomic data from Australia and Germany.eng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät
dc.subjectgender differenceseng
dc.subjecttime useeng
dc.subjectpaid workeng
dc.subjecthousehold productioneng
dc.subject.ddc330 Wirtschaft
dc.titleTotal Work and Gender
dc.typebook
dc.subtitleFacts and Possible Explanations
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-100199233
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/4382
local.edoc.container-titleSonderforschungsbereich 649: Ökonomisches Risiko
local.edoc.pages37
local.edoc.type-nameBuch
local.edoc.container-typeseries
local.edoc.container-type-nameSchriftenreihe
local.edoc.container-volume2012
local.edoc.container-issue7
local.edoc.container-year2012
local.edoc.container-erstkatid2195055-6

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