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2002-01-01Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.1108/07378830210733990
Copyright in the networked world
dc.contributor.authorSeadle, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-17T00:43:00Z
dc.date.available2017-06-17T00:43:00Z
dc.date.created2007-10-05
dc.date.issued2002-01-01
dc.date.submitted2007-10-05
dc.identifier.issn0737-8831
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.hu-berlin.de/18452/9974
dc.description.abstractIn copyright law, the principle of moral rights is that some part of the creator’s personality has gone into each original work, and that that element of personality cannot be sold or transferred. Moral rights are not about money, which is readily divisible, but about concepts like reputation and integrity, which are not. This column offers three examples of international collaborations where moral rights expectations could clash. At present the best remedy for moral rights disputes in the neworked environment is for all parties to understand the potential for diverging expectations.eng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Philosophische Fakultät I
dc.subjectCopyrighteng
dc.subjectEthicseng
dc.subject.ddc020 Bibliotheks- und Informationswissenschaft
dc.titleCopyright in the networked world
dc.typearticle
dc.subtitlemoral rights
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:11-10080399
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/07378830210733990
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.18452/9322
local.edoc.container-titleLibrary Hi Tech
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.institutionPhilosophische Fakultät I
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/
local.edoc.container-volume20
local.edoc.container-issue1
local.edoc.container-firstpage124
local.edoc.container-lastpage127
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewed

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